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Peru Travel Alert

The State Department alerts U.S. citizens to the damage caused by the flooding and landslides in several regions of Peru.

The State of Emergency issued by the Government of Peru remains in effect.  This Travel Alert expires on May 31, 2017.

The City of Cusco, the archaeological site of Machu Picchu and the tourist areas in the Sacred Valley and Lake Titicaca have not experienced flooding to date. The coastal area south of Lima has returned to normal conditions. Peru’s Amazon Basin has received typical levels of rainfall. 

A map from the Government of Peru showing the affected districts is available at http://unasolafuerza.pe/.

You are encouraged to carefully review the safety situation of your destination and modes of transportation before travel. Visit the link above for the latest information.

Heavy rains have resulted in extensive damage to homes, water supply facilities, schools, hospitals, roads, and bridges in several regions. The Government of Peru continues to repair roads and bridges especially along the Pan American highway and other vital access routes in the northern part of Peru. The Government of Peru is also working to repair water supply facilities, sanitation systems, schools, and hospitals in the affected areas. More than 1.1 million Peruvians were affected by the floods with approximately 46,000 still residing in camps and shelters and many more living with friends and family. In northern coastal Peru, standing water has increased the number of cases of mosquito-borne illnesses such as Dengue, Zika, and Chikungunya despite fumigation efforts. Additionally, there has been a spike in Leptospirosis and other diarrheal diseases recently in flooded areas. Local public health authorities warn of more cases of various diarrheal diseases and mosquito-borne viral diseases in the affected areas. Therefore, ensuring compliance with usual guidance for safe drinking water and mosquito avoidance measures is highly recommended. The CDC website has specific guidance on these measures.

Travel to impacted areas is likely to be delayed and may be dangerous due to bad road conditions. If you experience issues while traveling, contact local authorities at iPeru (01-574-8000; iperu@promperu.gob.pe), which maintains offices in cities around the country and regularly updates information on local developments affecting travelers, including alternative methods of transit. 

Listen to travel alerts and safety instructions from local authorities and avoid flooded areas. Establish a plan for maintaining contact with family and friends and keep them informed of your itinerary. 

The Peruvian police report traffic on the Carretera Central is now flowing normally, with a few sections experiencing delays as road crews repair damages. Official U.S. government travel to and along areas of the Carretera Central will only be allowed on a case-by-case basis. Travelers, including U.S. government employees, are encouraged to confirm with hotel operators located in the coastal Departments of Piura, Lambayeque, La Libertad, and Tumbes that sanitation systems are operational and clean drinking water is available. All Peace Corps volunteers who were relocated from affected regions are scheduled to return in May. Most are expected to be able to return to serve in their sites in Piura, Lambayeque and Trujillo. 

For further information:

  • See the State Department’s travel website for the Worldwide Caution, Travel Warnings, Travel Alerts, and Country Specific Information for Peru.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive security messages and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.
  • Contact the U.S. Embassy in Peru, located in Monterrico, a suburb of Lima, at Avenida La Encalada, Block Seventeen.  You can call the Embassy at 51-1-618-2000 during business hours, 8:00am to 5:00pm Monday through Friday, or dial the same number to reach a duty officer for after-hours emergencies.
  • Call 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the United States and Canada or 1-202-501-4444 from other countries from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).
Posted in Travel Alerts (U.S. Dept of State)

Pakistan Travel Warning

The Department of State warns U.S. citizens against all non-essential travel to Pakistan.

This Travel Warning replaces the Travel Warning dated October 7, 2016.

Consular services provided by the American Embassy in Islamabad, the Consulate General in Karachi, and the Consulate General in Lahore are often limited due to the security environment. At this time, the Consulate General in Peshawar is not providing consular services. 

Pakistan continues to experience significant terrorist violence, including sectarian attacks. Targeted attacks against government officials, humanitarian and non-governmental organization (NGO) employees, tribal elders, and law enforcement personnel are common. Throughout Pakistan, foreign and indigenous terrorist groups continue to pose a danger to U.S. citizens.  Evidence suggests that some victims of terrorist activity have been targeted because they are Americans. Terrorists and criminal groups have resorted to kidnapping for ransom.

The Government of Pakistan maintains heightened security measures, particularly in major cities, following attacks or in response to threats.

Terrorists have targeted:

  • Heavily guarded facilities, such as military installations and airports 
  • Universities, schools, and hospitals
  • Places of worship of various faiths
  • Rallies, public parks, and sports venues
  • Hotels, markets, shopping malls, and restaurants

In October 2016, terrorists killed at least 60 people and injured 190 at a police training college in Quetta, Balochistan. In November 2016, a suicide bomber detonated himself at the Sufi Shah Noorani Shrine in Khudzar, Balochistan, killing at least 52 people and injuring over 100 others. In January 2017, an improvised explosive device placed in a marketplace in Kurram Valley in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) killed at least 25 people and injured at least 87 others. In February 2017, one suicide bomber detonated himself outside the Punjab Assembly in Lahore, killing at least 14 people and injuring at least 87 and another detonated himself in the Sufi Shrine of Lal Shahbaz Qalandar, killing at least 88 people and injuring over 350.

Sectarian violence remains a serious threat throughout Pakistan, and the Government of Pakistan continues to enforce blasphemy laws. Religious minority communities have been victims of targeted killings and accusations of blasphemy. 

The local government restricts access for foreigners to many areas, including:

  • the FATA along the Pakistan-Afghanistan border,
  • Swat Valley in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province
  •  the area adjacent to the Line of Control in the disputed territory of Kashmir
  • much of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province and Balochistan

Travel by U.S. government personnel within Pakistan is restricted and movements by U.S. government personnel outside of Islamabad are severely restricted.  U.S. government personnel may not:

  • Attend services at places of worship without prior approval.
  • Use public transportation or stay overnight at hotels in Pakistan.

If you choose to live or travel in Pakistan despite this warning, you should:

  • Vary travel routes and timing, especially for routine trips.
  • Minimize the duration of trips to public markets, restaurants, and other locations.
  • Minimize the number of U.S./western nationals congregating in any one location at any time.
  • Avoid hotels that do not apply stringent security measures.
  • Take a photo of your passport, entry stamp and Pakistani visa, and keep it with you at all times.  Keep digital copies of these documents in a secure, electronically accessible place.

Advisory Notice to Airmen (NOTAM): The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a NOTAM concerning the risks to civil aviation operating in Pakistan, particularly at low altitude, during the arrival and departure phases of flight, and when on the ground, due to extremist/militant activity. The Advisory NOTAM does not prohibit U.S. operators or airmen from operating in the specified area, as it is strictly an advisory notice. 

For background information on FAA flight prohibitions and advisories for U.S. civil aviation, see the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

For further information:

  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive security messages and make it easier for us to locate you in an emergency.
  • Contact the U.S. Embassy in Islamabad, located at Diplomatic Enclave, Ramna 5, Islamabad, Pakistan, by email at ACSIslamabad@state.gov.  The after-hours emergency assistance number for U.S. citizens is (92)(51) 201-4000 or (92)(51)201-5000.
  • Contact the U.S. Consulate General in Karachi, located at Plot 3-5 New TPX Area, Mai Kolachi Road.  The after-hours emergency assistance number for U.S. citizens is (92-21) 3527-5000.
  • Contact the U.S. Consulate General in Lahore, located at 50, Shahrah-e-Abdul Hameed Bin Badees, (Old Empress Road) near Shimla Hill Circle.  The after-hours emergency assistance number for U.S. citizens is (92-42)3603-4000.
  • Call 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the United States and Canada or 1-202-501-4444 from other countries from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).
  • Follow us on Twitter and Facebook
Posted in Travel Warnings (U.S. Dept of State)

Israel, The West Bank and Gaza Travel Warning

The Department of State warns U.S. citizens against all travel to the Gaza Strip and urges those present to depart.

The security situation remains complex in Israel and the West Bank and can change quickly depending on the political environment, recent events, and particular geographic location. U.S. citizens should exercise caution and remain aware of their surroundings when traveling to areas where there are heightened tensions and security risks. The Government of Israel and the Palestinian Authority both make considerable efforts to ensure security, particularly in areas where foreigners frequently travel. This replaces the Travel Warning issued August 23, 2016.  

Gaza is under the control of Hamas, a U.S. government-designated foreign terrorist organization. The security environment within Gaza and on its borders is dangerous and volatile.  Violent demonstrations and shootings occur on a frequent basis and the collateral risks are high. While Israel and Hamas continue to observe the temporary cease-fire that ended the latest Gaza conflict in 2014, sporadic mortar or rocket fire and corresponding Israeli military responses continue to occur.

Within Israel and the West Bank, the possibility of random violence continues to exist and can happen without warning. The frequency of attacks has declined significantly since a rise in political and religious tensions led to a spike in violence in October 2015. U.S. citizens have been killed and wounded in recent attacks, though there is no indication they were specifically targeted based on nationality. Perceived religious affiliation was a factor in some of the attacks, and the majority of recent attacks have targeted uniformed Israeli security forces often in proximity to checkpoints throughout Jerusalem and the West Bank or near religious sites significant to multiple faiths. Attacks were carried out using knives, vehicles, and guns. Israeli security forces reacted with deadly force, which has resulted in some bystanders being injured or killed in the crossfire. U.S. citizens should stay abreast of current events in order to know what areas to avoid when traveling throughout the region.

For your safety, the Department of State recommends that U.S. citizens:

  • Avoid all travel to the Gaza Strip, and if you are there, leave as soon as you are able;
  • Maintain a high degree of situational awareness and exercise caution at all times, especially at checkpoints and other areas with a significant presence of security forces;
  • Avoid demonstrations and large gatherings – which can turn violent – and steer clear of neighborhoods where police have restricted access;
  • Beware of and report unattended items or packages;
  • Follow the instructions of security and emergency officials;
  • Report suspicious activities or items to security officials; and
  • Learn the location of the nearest bomb shelter or other hardened shelter. 

When planning their own travel, U.S. citizens should consider the following rules that apply to U.S. government employee travel:

  • U.S. government employees are not allowed to travel to Gaza;
  • With the exception of Jericho, Bethlehem, and along Routes 1, 443, and 90, U.S. government employees are prohibited from personal travel within the West Bank.  Restrictions on personal travel by U.S. government employees may change depending on the security environment;
  • All other U.S. government travel into the West Bank outside the aforementioned areas must be for official business and conducted with enhanced security measures; 
  • U.S. government staff take additional security precautions when visiting refugee camps, West Bank universities, and “seam areas” where Israelis and Palestinians are in proximity to each other, and which have historically been flashpoints for violence.  For example, sites with significant religious meaning to multiple faiths can be subject to violent protests or security incidents with little or no warning, especially during or around significant religious holidays;
  • U.S. government employees are prohibited from personal travel into Jerusalem’s Old City on Fridays during the Muslim month of Ramadan.  The U.S. government occasionally restricts travel for its employees to the Old City based on the current security environment;
  • U.S. government employees are prohibited from using public buses and public bus terminals throughout Israel and the West Bank; and
  • U.S. government employees must observe additional security requirements  if traveling for any reason to the following locations:

o   within 7 miles of the Gaza demarcation line;

o   within 1.5 miles of the Lebanon border; 

o   on or east of Route 98 in the Golan; and

o   within 1.5 miles of the Egypt border along the Sinai (including all portions of Route 10 and portions of Route 12).

U.S. citizens planning to travel to Israel, the West Bank, or Gaza should consult the detailed information concerning entry and exit difficulties in the Country Specific Information (CSI). The CSI also provides detailed guidance on crime and safety conditions within Israel, Jerusalem, the West Bank, and Gaza.

For further detailed information and assistance:

  • In Israel, the Golan Heights, and ports of entry at Ben Gurion Airport, Haifa Port, the northern (Jordan River/Sheikh Hussein) and southern (Arava) border crossings connecting Israel and Jordan, and the border crossings between Israel and Egypt, contact the Consular Section of the U.S. Embassy in Tel Aviv. The after-hours emergency number is (972)(3)519-7575.
  • In Jerusalem, the West Bank, Gaza, and the Allenby/King Hussein Bridge crossing between the West Bank and Jordan, contact the Consular Section of the U.S. Consulate General in Jerusalem. The after-hours emergency number is (972)(2)622-7250. 
  • In northern Israel, contact the Consular Agency in Haifa. The after-hours emergency number is (972)(3)519-7575.
  • Enroll in the Department of State’s Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) in order to obtain the most current information on travel and security within Israel, the West Bank and Gaza.
  • Up-to-date information on security conditions can also be accessed at http://israel.usembassy.govhttp://jerusalem.usconsulate.gov or on the Embassy and Consulate General Facebook pages. 
  • Up-to-date information on travel and security can be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the United States and Canada, or, for callers outside of the United States and Canada, on a regular toll-line at 1-202-501-4444. These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).
Posted in Travel Warnings (U.S. Dept of State)

Niger Travel Warning

The U.S. Department of State warns U.S. citizens of the risks of travel to Niger due to terrorist activity, kidnappings and high crime.

The Department recommends U.S. citizens avoid travel to Niger’s border regions, particularly the Malian border area, Diffa region and Lake Chad Basin area because of activity by extremist groups including al-Qa’eda in the Lands of the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), the self-proclaimed Islamic State of Iraq and ash-Sham – Islamic State West Africa, and Boko Haram. Due to security concerns and travel restrictions, the U.S. Embassy’s ability to assist U.S. citizens in remote and rural areas is very limited. This replaces the Travel Warning dated January 21, 2016.

Terrorist organizations, armed robbers and smugglers operate in the areas bordering Mali, Libya, and throughout northern Niger. Mali-based extremist groups have crossed the border and carried out multiple lethal attacks on Nigerien security forces.

The government of Niger has maintained a state of emergency in the Diffa region since February 10, 2015, and a curfew has been in place in the Diffa region since December 2014. The Nigerien government declared a state of emergency on March 3, 2017 for seven departments of the Tillaberi and Tahoua regions bordering Mali after a spate of deadly attacks.

There is significant potential for violent crime outside Niamey, and armed robbers target travelers throughout the country. Outside the city of Niamey, all U.S. Embassy personnel are required to travel only during daylight hours in a minimum two-vehicle convoy accompanied by armed Nigerien government security escorts.

There is a high threat of kidnapping by terrorist groups including AQIM, which has kidnapped Westerners and threatened U.S. citizens in Niger. As a result of safety and security concerns some organizations, including foreign companies, NGOs and private aid organizations, have suspended operations in Niger or withdrawn family members and/or staff.

For further information:

Posted in Travel Warnings (U.S. Dept of State)

Niger Travel Warning

The U.S. Department of State warns U.S. citizens of the risks of travel to Niger due to terrorist activity, kidnappings and high crime.

The Department recommends U.S. citizens avoid travel to Niger’s border regions, particularly the Malian border area, Diffa region and Lake Chad Basin area because of activity by extremist groups including al-Qa’eda in the Lands of the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), the self-proclaimed Islamic State of Iraq and ash-Sham – Islamic State West Africa, and Boko Haram. Due to security concerns and travel restrictions, the U.S. Embassy’s ability to assist U.S. citizens in remote and rural areas is very limited. This replaces the Travel Warning dated January 21, 2016.

Terrorist organizations, armed robbers and smugglers operate in the areas bordering Mali, Libya, and throughout northern Niger. Mali-based extremist groups have crossed the border and carried out multiple lethal attacks on Nigerien security forces.

The government of Niger has maintained a state of emergency in the Diffa region since February 10, 2015, and a curfew has been in place in the Diffa region since December 2014. The Nigerien government declared a state of emergency on March 3, 2017 for seven departments of the Tillaberi and Tahoua regions bordering Mali after a spate of deadly attacks.

There is significant potential for violent crime outside Niamey, and armed robbers target travelers throughout the country. Outside the city of Niamey, all U.S. Embassy personnel are required to travel only during daylight hours in a minimum two-vehicle convoy accompanied by armed Nigerien government security escorts.

There is a high threat of kidnapping by terrorist groups including AQIM, which has kidnapped Westerners and threatened U.S. citizens in Niger. As a result of safety and security concerns some organizations, including foreign companies, NGOs and private aid organizations, have suspended operations in Niger or withdrawn family members and/or staff.

For further information:

Posted in Travel Warnings (U.S. Dept of State)

Kenya Travel Alert

The State Department alerts U.S. citizens residing in or traveling to Kenya that general elections are scheduled for August 8, 2017.

Candidate selection for national and county offices will take place throughout the country in April, followed by nationwide campaigning. This Travel Alert expires on August 31, 2017.

Rallies, demonstrations, and protests may occur with little notice and even those intended to be peaceful can escalate into violence. As with all large events, there is also the opportunity for criminal elements or terrorists to target participants and visitors. You should avoid areas of gatherings, protests, and demonstrations, and exercise caution if unexpectedly in the vicinity of any such events.

  • U.S. citizens are urged to exercise caution and remain abreast of the security situation. 
  • Monitor media and local information sources and factor updated information into personal travel plans and activities.
  • Avoid crowds and remain alert when using public transportation. 
  • Report specific safety concerns to local law enforcement authorities.
  • Stay in touch with your family members and ensure they know how to reach you in the event of an emergency.
  • Restrictions on traffic circulation, either imposed by the authorities or caused by political rallies, could occur during the elections period.  Please refer to our Security Message dated March 13, 2017 for tips on personal preparedness.

For further information:

Posted in Travel Alerts (U.S. Dept of State)

Nigeria Travel Warning

The Department of State warns U.S. citizens of the risks of travel to Nigeria and recommends that U.S. citizens avoid all but essential travel to Adamawa, Bauchi, Borno, Gombe, Kano, and Yobe states because the security situation in northeast Nigeria remains fluid and unpredictable.

Very poor transportation infrastructure also makes it difficult for the U.S. Mission to provide consular services in these states. All U.S. citizens should have evacuation plans that do not solely rely on U.S. government assistance. Due to the risk of kidnappings, robberies, and other armed attacks, U.S. citizens should also avoid all but essential travel to: Bayelsa, Delta, Jigawa, Kaduna, Katsina, Plateau, Rivers, Sokoto, and Zamfara states. This replaces the Travel Warning dated February 8, 2017.

Boko Haram, an extremist group based in the northeast, has targeted churches, schools, mosques, government installations, educational institutions, and entertainment venues in Adamawa, Bauchi, Borno, Gombe, Kaduna, Kano, Plateau, Taraba, the Federal Capital Territory, and Yobe states. Hundreds of thousands of Nigerians have been displaced as a result of violence in the north. Islamic State West Africa, which is now a distinct group from Boko Haram, is present in Nigeria, and may seek to attack locations frequented by westerners including major population centers. 

U.S. citizens should be vigilant at public gatherings and locations frequented by foreigners. Markets, hotels, restaurants, bars, and places of worship may become targets for terrorist attacks. Exercise extreme caution throughout the country due to the threat of indiscriminate violence. 

Travel to the Gulf of Guinea should also be avoided because of the threat of piracy.

U.S. Mission personnel are subject to restrictions when traveling in Nigeria, with the exception of local areas of Abuja and Lagos, and may be subject to other constraints as security conditions warrant.

For further information:

  • See the State Department's travel website for the Worldwide Caution,Travel Warnings, Travel Alerts, and Nigeria Country-Specific Information.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive security messages and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Contact the U.S. Embassy in Abuja, located at Plot 1075 Diplomatic Drive, Central District Area, open Monday-Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The U.S. Consulate General in Lagos, located at 2 Walter Carrington Crescent, Victoria Island, is open Monday-Thursday from 7:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. and Friday from 7:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. The U.S. Embassy in Abuja can be reached by telephone, including after-hours emergencies, at +234 (9) 461-4176 or +234 (9) 461-4000, or by email at AbujaACS@state.gov. The U.S. Consulate General in Lagos can be reached by telephone, including after-hours emergencies, at +234 (1) 460-3600 or +234 (1) 460-3400, or by email at LagosACS@state.gov. For more information, please visit the U.S. Mission in Nigeria website.
  • Call 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the United States and Canada or 1-202-501-4444 from other countries from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).
  • Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.
Posted in Travel Warnings (U.S. Dept of State)

Sudan Travel Warning

The U.S. Department of State warns U.S. citizens not to travel to Sudan.

U.S. citizens should avoid all travel to the Darfur region, Blue Nile, and Southern Kordofan states and consider carefully before planning travel to other areas of Sudan due to the risks of terrorism, armed conflict and violent crime. The U.S. Embassy's ability to provide services outside of Khartoum is extremely limited. This replaces the Travel Warning issued on January 21, 2016.

Terrorist groups are active in Sudan and have stated their intent to harm Westerners and Western interests through suicide operations, bombings, shootings, and kidnappings. Violent crimes targeting Westerners, including kidnappings, armed robberies, home invasions, and carjacking occur everywhere in Sudan but are particularly prevalent in the Darfur region.

U.S. citizens who choose to travel to Sudan despite this warning should be vigilant and aware of their surroundings at all times, especially when at public gatherings and any location frequented by foreigners. Exercise extreme caution, monitor reliable news sources for information on the local security situation, and follow the instructions of local authorities. All U.S. citizens in Sudan should periodically assess their personal security and have evacuation plans that do not rely on U.S. government assistance.

Despite numerous cease fires declared by the Government of Sudan and opposition forces, tensions in the Darfur region, along the border between Chad and Sudan, and in areas that border South Sudan, including the disputed area of Abyei‎ remain high and violence continues. In addition to risking injury or death, U.S. citizens who go to these areas without the permission of the Sudanese government may be detained by security forces.

The U.S. Embassy requires U.S. government personnel in Sudan to use armored vehicles for all travel, and prohibits travel outside of Khartoum without advance permission and extra security precautions.  Family members of U.S. government employees assigned to Sudan must be at least 21 years old in order to live there.

For further information:

  • See the State Department's travel website for the Worldwide Caution, Travel Warnings, Travel Alerts, and Country Specific Information for Sudan.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive security messages and make it easier to locate you in an emergency. 
  • Contact the U.S. Embassy in Sudan located at P.O. Box 699, Kilo 10, Soba, at +(249) 1-870-22000), from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Sunday through Thursday. After-hours emergency number for U.S. citizens is +249-187-022000 (International), or 0187-022000 (Local). Press "0" or remain on the line
  • Call 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the United States and Canada or 1-202-501-4444 from other countries from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).
  • Follow us on Twitter and Facebook

 

Posted in Travel Warnings (U.S. Dept of State)

Sudan Travel Warning

The U.S. Department of State warns U.S. citizens not to travel to Sudan.

U.S. citizens should avoid all travel to the Darfur region, Blue Nile, and Southern Kordofan states and consider carefully before planning travel to other areas of Sudan due to the risks of terrorism, armed conflict and violent crime. The U.S. Embassy's ability to provide services outside of Khartoum is extremely limited. This replaces the Travel Warning issued on January 21, 2016.

Terrorist groups are active in Sudan and have stated their intent to harm Westerners and Western interests through suicide operations, bombings, shootings, and kidnappings. Violent crimes targeting Westerners, including kidnappings, armed robberies, home invasions, and carjacking occur everywhere in Sudan but are particularly prevalent in the Darfur region.

U.S. citizens who choose to travel to Sudan despite this warning should be vigilant and aware of their surroundings at all times, especially when at public gatherings and any location frequented by foreigners. Exercise extreme caution, monitor reliable news sources for information on the local security situation, and follow the instructions of local authorities. All U.S. citizens in Sudan should periodically assess their personal security and have evacuation plans that do not rely on U.S. government assistance.

Despite numerous cease fires declared by the Government of Sudan and opposition forces, tensions in the Darfur region, along the border between Chad and Sudan, and in areas that border South Sudan, including the disputed area of Abyei‎ remain high and violence continues. In addition to risking injury or death, U.S. citizens who go to these areas without the permission of the Sudanese government may be detained by security forces.

The U.S. Embassy requires U.S. government personnel in Sudan to use armored vehicles for all travel, and prohibits travel outside of Khartoum without advance permission and extra security precautions.  Family members of U.S. government employees assigned to Sudan must be at least 21 years old in order to live there.

For further information:

  • See the State Department's travel website for the Worldwide Caution, Travel Warnings, Travel Alerts, and Country Specific Information for Sudan.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive security messages and make it easier to locate you in an emergency. 
  • Contact the U.S. Embassy in Sudan located at P.O. Box 699, Kilo 10, Soba, at +(249) 1-870-22000), from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Sunday through Thursday. After-hours emergency number for U.S. citizens is +249-187-022000 (International), or 0187-022000 (Local). Press "0" or remain on the line
  • Call 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the United States and Canada or 1-202-501-4444 from other countries from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).
  • Follow us on Twitter and Facebook

 

Posted in Travel Warnings (U.S. Dept of State)

Democratic Republic of the Congo Travel Warning

The Department of State warns U.S. citizens to avoid unnecessary travel to the DRC.

Very poor transportation infrastructure throughout the country and poor security conditions in eastern DRC make it difficult for the U.S. Embassy to provide consular services anywhere outside of Kinshasa.  All U.S. citizens should have evacuation plans that do not rely solely on U.S. government assistance.  This replaces the Travel Warning dated December 23, 2016.

Armed groups, bandits, and some elements of the Congolese armed forces operate in the provinces of North and South Kivu, Bas-Uele, Haut-Uele, Ituri, Tanganyika, Haut-Lomami, and the Kasai region. These groups have been known to kill, rape, kidnap, pillage, and carry out military or paramilitary operations in which civilians may be indiscriminately targeted. 

Congolese military and United Nations forces continue to operate throughout North and South Kivu and near the DRC's borders with the Central African Republic and the Republic of South Sudan, particularly in and around Garamba National Park. Travelers in the region may encounter troop movements, armored vehicles and attack helicopters. Kidnapping for ransom is also common, particularly in areas north and west of Goma, North Kivu. 

For further information:

Posted in Travel Warnings (U.S. Dept of State)